The 31 Best Horror Movie Sequels of All Time (GIFS)

MOVIES 21 – 25

giphyThe Purge: Anarchy (2014), which revolves around one night every year when all crime in American becomes legal. “Anarchy” feels like one of those elaborate haunted house attractions, where you roam from room to room. Only instead, you’re chased from room to room by people who want to kill you, and the haunted house is all of Los Angeles.
*Full review here; buy it here.


tumblr_nnxx257nT51t0demio1_500Nekromantik 2 (1991), which follows a love triangle between a woman and two men– one alive and one dead. Though now regarded as an amateurish cult classic among horror die-hards, “Nekromantik 2” explores themes taboo enough to get it seized by authorities in Munich 12 days after its release. But for all its blood, gore and violence, this splatter flick has a lot to say about the shock value of necrophilia in art and our tolerance for violence in media.
*Full review here; buy it here.


tumblr_n9tce2qPTN1qedb29o1_500Damien: Omen II (1978), which follows Damien’s journey to discovering his true identity as the anti-Christ. “Omen II” continues the narrative with very consistent and deliberate pacing. Although not as scary as the original, the atmospheric tension, coupled with Damnien’s developing powers, helps to elevate the fear factor on what otherwise might be regarded as a dramatic thriller.
*Full review here; buy it here.


Paranormal-Activity-2-GIF-paranormal-actitvity-2-30543471-500-203

Paranormal Activity 2 (2010), which benefits from the demon’s very physical presence in the series. Being able to see the activity unravel through multiple lenses (Daniel sets up about four and also uses a handheld) is thrilling. Scanning the screen for the titular presence is more enjoyable than before now that it switches between multiple rooms. “Paranormal Activity 2” is a worthy, slow-burning entry of the series.
*Full review here; buy it here.


tumblr_no421hb3mw1rpc5kho1_500Psycho II (1983), which focuses on Norman Bates as the protagonist rather than purely the villain. In some ways, it feels like more of a homage to Hitchcock’s classic than a true sequel. Despite a higher body count, the real horror is contained in Norman’s mind– especially when Mother’s voice is heard. “Psycho II” is a seemingly unnecessary sequel that expands on Hitchcock’s narrative in a suitably suspenseful and enticing manner thanks to another charismatic performance by Anthony Perkins.
*Full review here; buy it here.

Barry Falls Jr
Barry was the managing editor of his university newspaper before contributing as a freelance content creator for Yahoo News and Esquire. He founded Horror Theory in 2014 to analyze horror films through a sociological lens.

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